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The Moons of Barsk

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Years after the events of Barsk: The Elephants' Graveyard, the lonely young outcast and physically-challenged Fant, Pizlo, is now a teenager. He still believes he hears voices from the planet’s moons, imparting secret knowledge to him alone. And so embarks on a dangerous voyage to learn the truth behind the messages. His quest will catapult him offworld for second time is Years after the events of Barsk: The Elephants' Graveyard, the lonely young outcast and physically-challenged Fant, Pizlo, is now a teenager. He still believes he hears voices from the planet’s moons, imparting secret knowledge to him alone. And so embarks on a dangerous voyage to learn the truth behind the messages. His quest will catapult him offworld for second time is his short life, and reveal things the galaxy isn’t yet ready to know. Elsewhere, Barsk's Senator Jorl, who can speak with the dead, navigates galactic politics as Barsk's unwelcome representative, and digs even deeper into the past than ever before to discover new truths of his own.


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Years after the events of Barsk: The Elephants' Graveyard, the lonely young outcast and physically-challenged Fant, Pizlo, is now a teenager. He still believes he hears voices from the planet’s moons, imparting secret knowledge to him alone. And so embarks on a dangerous voyage to learn the truth behind the messages. His quest will catapult him offworld for second time is Years after the events of Barsk: The Elephants' Graveyard, the lonely young outcast and physically-challenged Fant, Pizlo, is now a teenager. He still believes he hears voices from the planet’s moons, imparting secret knowledge to him alone. And so embarks on a dangerous voyage to learn the truth behind the messages. His quest will catapult him offworld for second time is his short life, and reveal things the galaxy isn’t yet ready to know. Elsewhere, Barsk's Senator Jorl, who can speak with the dead, navigates galactic politics as Barsk's unwelcome representative, and digs even deeper into the past than ever before to discover new truths of his own.

30 review for The Moons of Barsk

  1. 5 out of 5

    Bradley

    Thanks to Netgalley for getting this early. I remember having a few issues with the first novel because of the feeling of aimlessness during the large opening. A hero's journey? Sure, but it wasn't until much later that the "abomination" started getting proactive and interesting in his own right. The end was particularly great. I love all the things that Speakers do: quantum stuff and memory stuff and speaking to the dead stuff all mixed into a heavy SF foam. My other concern was about the REASON Thanks to Netgalley for getting this early. I remember having a few issues with the first novel because of the feeling of aimlessness during the large opening. A hero's journey? Sure, but it wasn't until much later that the "abomination" started getting proactive and interesting in his own right. The end was particularly great. I love all the things that Speakers do: quantum stuff and memory stuff and speaking to the dead stuff all mixed into a heavy SF foam. My other concern was about the REASONS for the total hate-on for the Fants, the humanoid elephants, by the rest of the other "humans" of different species. Some old wrong, the need to quarantine the whole race based on some kind of evil that even the ghosts of old grandmothers can't quite pin down. And yet, the Fants are still vilified. Fast forward to this new novel. Our young elephant has gone from a 12-year-old to a 14-year-old and he has rockin powers, being able to split his consciousness, speak to the dead, have telepathy across space, unlimited by lightspeed. Coolness. And even his status as an "abomination" is mitigated by a ton of new friends he made during the first book. Excellent. And we continue on with a number of additional PoVs as well, including the Speakers, the ruling class, and some others, all of which add dimensions to the tale which I thought were pretty good. We're dealing with the issue of the Fants, the technology they developed on the sly, and their place in the greater galactic society. Yes, the big driver is still a whole race's destiny, the prejudice surrounding them, and the possible "feel good" solution of mixing up the greater peoples with those of the Fants. For the MOST part, I really enjoyed the drive, the meat of this whole novel, and the conclusion. We really had to make some sort of conflict and resolution with the ruling class of Speakers. And so we did, along with a drop-down, a kick-ass awesome scene full of quantum-memory goodness. But. And here's where I reduce this book from a total 5-star rating to a 4. Even though we were introduced to the possibility of the "big solution" that eventually comes at the end, how it is actually pulled off kinda leaves a lot to be desired. It's not officially a deus-ex-machina, but it seriously skirts the edges of one. Other than that!? I think it's superior to the first. There are more hints as to the deep dark past for the Fants, there are great and interesting developments for the race, and our little abomination is getting kinda beast. :)

  2. 5 out of 5

    Justine

    This is an absolutely excellent sequel to Barsk: The Elephants' Graveyard. Several years have passed since the first book and Pizlo, the Abomination of Keslo, is no longer a child but a teenager on the cusp of adulthood. He has grown substantially into his many gifts, and wrestles with the moral and philosophical questions raised by his precognitive ability. To what extent is the future fixed and is it possible to make oneself an agent of change in the face of apparent destiny? In trademark fashio This is an absolutely excellent sequel to Barsk: The Elephants' Graveyard. Several years have passed since the first book and Pizlo, the Abomination of Keslo, is no longer a child but a teenager on the cusp of adulthood. He has grown substantially into his many gifts, and wrestles with the moral and philosophical questions raised by his precognitive ability. To what extent is the future fixed and is it possible to make oneself an agent of change in the face of apparent destiny? In trademark fashion, Pizlo becomes enmeshed in events seemingly too large for any one person to change. But his unique combination of innocence and depth of understanding makes it impossible for him not to try. A deep and deceptively simple story about being the change you want to see, set in a world completely unlike yet very much the same as the one we live in. The Moons of Barsk is going on my favourites 2018 shelf.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Lindsay

    A return to the universe of Barsk: The Elephants' Graveyard, where humanity is long extinct and the galaxy is populated by various races of uplifted animal species with only two, based on two different species of elephant, kept separate by treaty and prejudice. It's nine years after the events of the first book, Pizlo is a teenager now and Jorl ben Tral is well established as an Alliance Senator and a bearer of an aleph on Barsk. Jorl also now has a wife and a young daughter and firmly has the at A return to the universe of Barsk: The Elephants' Graveyard, where humanity is long extinct and the galaxy is populated by various races of uplifted animal species with only two, based on two different species of elephant, kept separate by treaty and prejudice. It's nine years after the events of the first book, Pizlo is a teenager now and Jorl ben Tral is well established as an Alliance Senator and a bearer of an aleph on Barsk. Jorl also now has a wife and a young daughter and firmly has the attention of a secret and powerful group of Fant called the Caudex who are working to ensure that the Alliance doesn't end up eliminating all Fant. Like the first, this is a beautifully written book with fascinating world-building. Schoen has taken the premises from the first book and greatly expanded upon them, both with the Caudex and how they interact with the rest of the Fant, and with the possibilities that the nefshon abilities have with out Magda's rules in the way. The messaging is strong as well, talking to the role of prejudice, diversity and rationality in society. It's also clear from the end of this one that there'll be at least one more in the series.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Denise

    My reaction to the narrator on the audio version probably influenced my feelings about this book. I got used to his voice but his pacing felt odd, with out of place pauses throughout sentences like he needed to take a breathe. Anyway I was happy to follow Pizlo as he enters puberty and questions EVERYTHING. I like that the elephants investigate memory manipulation- kind of an in joke about long memories. The overall plot was perhaps a bit more complex then necessary and some points were repeated My reaction to the narrator on the audio version probably influenced my feelings about this book. I got used to his voice but his pacing felt odd, with out of place pauses throughout sentences like he needed to take a breathe. Anyway I was happy to follow Pizlo as he enters puberty and questions EVERYTHING. I like that the elephants investigate memory manipulation- kind of an in joke about long memories. The overall plot was perhaps a bit more complex then necessary and some points were repeated in a way that made me think the author had forgotten he’d mentioned them previously. I imagine a book three will be written. I’ll look forward to reading it but I think the next steps in the plot might be self-evident.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Hélène Louise

    (I thank Netgalley and Macmillan-Tor/Forge for sending me the ARC in exchange for my honest review) I read, two years ago, "Barsk, the elephant graveyard" and it was an incredible read. The kind of read I, even after having read thousands of books as I've had, will never forget. I'm getting more and more touchy and demanding with my readings, not by vice, but because having read so many books, and review some hundreds, and wrote some more, have made me very critical: I now know what I like, what (I thank Netgalley and Macmillan-Tor/Forge for sending me the ARC in exchange for my honest review) I read, two years ago, "Barsk, the elephant graveyard" and it was an incredible read. The kind of read I, even after having read thousands of books as I've had, will never forget. I'm getting more and more touchy and demanding with my readings, not by vice, but because having read so many books, and review some hundreds, and wrote some more, have made me very critical: I now know what I like, what I don't want to read about, and what I can't read on regardless some obvious narrative, psychological or logical flaws. "Barsk, the elephants' graveyard" was an outstanding read, just perfect, so rare... At the time I didn't know that a sequel was to be expected. When I saw "The moons of Barsk" on Netgalley, I couldn't believe my luck! I immediately pre-ordered the pbook (such a beautiful cover!) and ask for the ARC. I was very proud and happy when my request was accepted and took care to re read the first Barsk Book before, as I've already planed to do this summer (premonition, eh? ). I particularly appreciated to re-read the first book before this one, but if you don't feel like doing so, you may spare yourself: all the principal elements are cleverly reintroduced in the beginning of the book, you won't feel lost (you probably will feel nostalgic and sorry not to have reread Barsk Book One, but... your mistake ^-^) The story takes place a few years after the end of the first book. Pizlo is now fourteen years old, and not much have changed for him, except for the fact that he's now a speaker, but just able to Speak with Jorl, his best friend, his mentor. Jorl has a good life, married, with a beloved child, Rina, and is juggling between his work as an historian, his family time and his role as a senator. Very quickly the story explodes in an incredible revelation, quite credible and logical in fact, and exhilarating in its fairness and cleverness. I can't say more about it, but I can tell that this new development is perfectly carved out and used to tell an exciting story. The new characters are perfect, a so human blend of brilliancy, humanity, lucidity and also thirst for power, egotism and weaknesses. If I loved this second book as much as the first one, I needed to read it slowly, to chew over it. I loved how the author chose to intensify his ideas, nurturing them in exciting and inspiring directions. For such an imaginary concept, Speaking is handled in a perfectly scientific way, which I applaud! Not complicated per se, but thorough, imaginative and cleverly used to make the story unforgettable. Again. A perfect "food for thoughts" book! If Pizlo isn't a child anymore, thinking much more a very wise and kind adult, suffering differently due to his life as a pariah, Lawrence M. Schoen demonstrates again how able he's to introduce believable and touching children, especially gifted ones with, this time, Jorl's daughter, Rina. And her doll, the very special Kokab! A riveting read, as clever, subtle and heart-warming as the first one, very human for all the extraordinary perfect exposition of elephant-like post-humans. A book which will, I can't doubt about it after reading the last sentence (so cruel for the reader...) be followed by a third one. I already can't wait, so happy to have found, by pure chance, a so special and perfect read for me!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    Disclaimers first: I know Lawrence M. Schoen slightly on social media (we have never met IRL), and he has hosted me on his Eating Authors blog series. I received an unedited copy via Netgalley for purposes of review; I won't comment specifically on the copy editing, on the assumption that it will get some more attention before publication. I enjoyed the first of this series - despite what seemed to me considerable stretches, even holes, in the worldbuilding - because it had a lot of heart and I Disclaimers first: I know Lawrence M. Schoen slightly on social media (we have never met IRL), and he has hosted me on his Eating Authors blog series. I received an unedited copy via Netgalley for purposes of review; I won't comment specifically on the copy editing, on the assumption that it will get some more attention before publication. I enjoyed the first of this series - despite what seemed to me considerable stretches, even holes, in the worldbuilding - because it had a lot of heart and I felt for the characters and their situation. The sequel is no different, although it held together better for me, and (unlike the first book) the ultimate resolution didn't seem excessively tidy, or depend on something that I saw as a plot hole or deus ex machina. There's an interesting theme at the heart of this one, which was alluded to in the first book: that the future is fixed if people act in the ways that their culture has programmed them to, but if they rise above that and exercise free choice, they can change the world. One of the several viewpoint characters, Pizlo, carries most of this theme and expresses it most clearly, and he, as an outsider to his society and a precognitive, is in a position to know. The other two viewpoint characters are set up as antagonists to one another, though they have more common cause than reason to fight one another (as one, but not the other, realizes). The tension between them was well sustained and well resolved, providing a strong emotional arc for all three viewpoint characters and for the book as a whole. Though I could quibble with the worldbuilding and some of the sentence-level writing, the storytelling here is at an excellent level, and if that's what you mostly go to a book for, this might well be the book for you.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie Cover2CoverBlog

    Coming soon...

  8. 5 out of 5

    Enso

    This is crossposted from https://openbuddha.com/2018/09/11/moo... I finished reading "The Moons of Barsk" a few weeks ago and wanted to put a review of it up for folks. This is the new book by the linguist, Lawrence M. Schoen and a sequel to his "Barsk: The Elephants' Graveyard" from a few years ago. In complete transparency, I was given a review copy of Moons but I was such a huge fan of his first book that I had been actively waiting for more from him. Barsk: The Elephants' Graveyard was an amaz This is crossposted from https://openbuddha.com/2018/09/11/moo... I finished reading "The Moons of Barsk" a few weeks ago and wanted to put a review of it up for folks. This is the new book by the linguist, Lawrence M. Schoen and a sequel to his "Barsk: The Elephants' Graveyard" from a few years ago. In complete transparency, I was given a review copy of Moons but I was such a huge fan of his first book that I had been actively waiting for more from him. Barsk: The Elephants' Graveyard was an amazing book and a breath of fresh air in how it was full of ideas that hadn't been rehashed to death as genre tropes (and even the ideas in it that were common enough tropes were handled in interesting ways). Moons continues on this vein and does not displease, though I do think it suffers a bit from being a "middle novel" in what I assume is a trilogy. It continues the story of the first book in new ways but does not, ultimately, tie the threads of story up completely but sets things up for continuance and conclusion later. The basic setup of the series is a kind of Island of Dr. Moreau writ large and on a galactic scale. There is a federation and the denizens of this federation are different races of humanoid or uplifted animals. I do not wish to spoil the first book for readers so I cannot go into any history that is revealed but things are explained to a fair degree in the first novel. The main characters of both books are Fants, which are distinct but similar species of upright, humanoid elephants. They are despised and viewed with disgust by the rest of the federation for their horrid (it seems) appearance to others and have long ago but exiled to a single world, out of sight. The first book deals with the possibility of pogroms and genocidal plots against the Fants by others and revelations about the history of the Federation, in general, and the facts in particular. In Moons, we pick up a few years after Graveyard, with the protagonist, Jorl, of the first book having grown a bit older and, possibly, a little wiser, but much of the emphasis in Moons is on Pizlo, who was a young child in Graveyard. He' now an adolescent attempting to find a place in the world and with his abilities. He's much more the focus of this book than Jorl (in my opinion) though Jorl is still a viewpoint character. In some ways, I find Jorl largely uninteresting. As a special sort of speaker, those members of the Federation who can recall the minds of the dead and communicate with them, he's in most ways too powerful to be interesting. Pizlo is also a speaker and a pre-cognitive, but he's young and deeply conflicted about his role in the universe and in fact society. Pizlo is a genetic outcast, meant to have been exposed and die at birth, because of the circumstances of his conception. As such, all members of fant society, with the exception of his mother, Jorl and, Jorl's immediate family, pretend that Pizlo is invisible. If a confrontation is forced, it escalates. This is a radically alienating thing to a young man, growing up hated and unwanted, but knowing (due to the voices in his head that may just be his abilities) that he has some sort of role to play. Where the first novel focused on the potential for violence and destruction towards the Fant from others, the second one has an exploration of violence from within Fant society, the kind of violence that clothes itself in necessity and "for the good of society." Jorl and Pizlo both explore questions of Fant history and future in a universe that hates and despises them. What would members of Fant society do to protect it, from outsiders but also from other Fant who find out too much about Fant history and potentially secret activities of some to protect the denizens of Barsk, their planet of exile? Overall, it was a fun read. I did not find it quite as engaging as Graveyard but I put much of that down to the first book having a high degree of uniqueness and being so unexpected. Moons is not badly written but I very much want to read the next book to see where it all winds up, assuming that this is a trilogy. The ideas of Graveyard continue to build and be developed, as do the characters, and the world expands in scope and depth as well. What will an adult Pizlo be like as he comes into his prime? Will Jorl ever figure out his own longterm place in helping the Fant, even from themselves? I look forward to finding out.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Thomas

    I really enjoyed this book. I saw this on the new shelf at my library, and I had met the author at the annual Klingon Language Institute conference (my first time going), so I picked it up and read the plot synopsis on the inside flap. I was intrigued. I knew that I hadn't read the first book in the series, but wasn't sure how direct a sequel it was, so decided to give it a shot anyway. It turns out it's a fairly direct sequel that expands on earlier events and threads, so I now want to go see th I really enjoyed this book. I saw this on the new shelf at my library, and I had met the author at the annual Klingon Language Institute conference (my first time going), so I picked it up and read the plot synopsis on the inside flap. I was intrigued. I knew that I hadn't read the first book in the series, but wasn't sure how direct a sequel it was, so decided to give it a shot anyway. It turns out it's a fairly direct sequel that expands on earlier events and threads, so I now want to go see that earlier point in these characters' lives. Anyway! Barsk is a world inhabited by two species of intelligent elephants. They have sequestered themselves from the larger galactic civilization and keep their lives simple and fairly technology-free. They also have a pathological aversion to "abominations", who are born deformed and different from normal Fant. One of our main characters is such an "abomination", but because we get to see the world from his viewpoint, as well as the few people who do not treat him as something to set out with the trash, that we connect with him as an individual - something that society cannot. This becomes important as the book progresses, and I appreciated the treatment given to his story and the implications for how we as humans handle those with disabilities or different skin color. Good science fiction morality in fine form. Other characters concern themselves with a thin line to the outside galaxy, and trying to figure out why, at the end of their lives, the Fant all hop on a boat and head out to sea, a la the Elves in LotR. I am oversimplifying so as not to give the plot away, but we get some good worldbuilding and some nice machinations that set things up for a third volume. I recommend you read the first book first, but The Moons of Barsk is a fine science fiction novel that applies modern societal commentary and representation to a framework that feels at home with classic science fiction. I recommend it.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Ward

    'The Moons of Barsk' is a thrilling science fiction adventure that fans of the genre are sure to love. Since this is the second book in the series, I highly recommend reading the first one beforehand. Otherwise you'll be incredibly confused right from the start and it'll only become worse as you read on and you'll miss out on all the beauty that this story holds. I thought every aspect of this novel to be done incredibly well - from the world building to the characters to the actual writing itsel 'The Moons of Barsk' is a thrilling science fiction adventure that fans of the genre are sure to love. Since this is the second book in the series, I highly recommend reading the first one beforehand. Otherwise you'll be incredibly confused right from the start and it'll only become worse as you read on and you'll miss out on all the beauty that this story holds. I thought every aspect of this novel to be done incredibly well - from the world building to the characters to the actual writing itself. It definitely showcases the author's talent and leaves the reader wanting more. The characters were all complex and well rounded with lots of different flaws and traits that made them realistic and easy to identify with. The story itself was intriguing and exciting and the author's writing style made it come to life before my eyes. The author uses detailed descriptions and incredibly vivid imagery to make Barsk and its characters come to life and give them depth, which was more than I had expected. I normally don't like the third person point of view style of writing, but I understand and appreciate the author's use of it for the novel. Anything else would've been way too confusing for the readers to follow. Even though it was written in the third person, I found myself drawn into the story and connecting with the various characters - which is unusual for me with this writing style. I very highly recommend this novel and series to fans of science fiction and readers looking for something different and new to try. Disclosure: I received a copy of the book in exchange for an honest review.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Chris Bauer

    I thoroughly enjoyed the first "Barsk" novel by Schoen last year. Filled with wonder, top-notch world building and not just interesting, but downright fascinating characters, "Barsk: The Elephant Graveyard" was an incredible read. Utterly unique and engrossing. Loved it. The second book of the series, "The Moons of Barsk" was somehow able to take the amazing elements of the first novel and make them even better. Much of the first novel dealt with the big "ideas" of the speculative world the autho I thoroughly enjoyed the first "Barsk" novel by Schoen last year. Filled with wonder, top-notch world building and not just interesting, but downright fascinating characters, "Barsk: The Elephant Graveyard" was an incredible read. Utterly unique and engrossing. Loved it. The second book of the series, "The Moons of Barsk" was somehow able to take the amazing elements of the first novel and make them even better. Much of the first novel dealt with the big "ideas" of the speculative world the author had created - this novel is much more micro-focused on the characters themselves. By turning the lens inward, the reader is able to better know the characters on the page and the author does a masterful job of creating rich, vivid, flawed characters who are challenged, defeated, forced to grow and make big decisions, not all with intended consequences. - the plot sails like a boat in a stiff breeze - the writing is rich and evocative - the tapestry of character interplay changes and morphs in beautiful patterns - multiple layers of conflicts create tense but enjoyable Acts II and III - the writing is of exceptional quality from start to finish One of my favorite elements which Schoen explores is the meta-nature of story and narrative and how big an impact that has on humanity or any other species for that matter. The elements of the novel which delve into that topic were among my favorites. In summary, if you're getting a bit jaded of reading run of the mill spec fiction, start this series. Now. You won't be disappointed.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Michele(mluker) Luker

    A very unique world with amazing depth, The Moons of Barsk is a Sci-Fi adventure that stretches your imagination with creative species and an original world. Pizlo, the abomination that the Fant species refuse to acknowledge, realizes he has a quest to fulfill. And this quest will lead to discoveries he never dreamed. This story is the second installment to the series. It has several different stories going on at the same time, that will intertwine as the story progresses. It is full of artistic i A very unique world with amazing depth, The Moons of Barsk is a Sci-Fi adventure that stretches your imagination with creative species and an original world. Pizlo, the abomination that the Fant species refuse to acknowledge, realizes he has a quest to fulfill. And this quest will lead to discoveries he never dreamed. This story is the second installment to the series. It has several different stories going on at the same time, that will intertwine as the story progresses. It is full of artistic imagination that will boggle your mind. I recommend reading this story slow, so you can absorb the depth of the theme. You appreciate the details and patience the author put into creating each characters' personality. Each one has so much intensity and individuality. The whole story has so much going on with the Fant species being isolated from the Alliance, politics, the knowledge and technology on Barsk that the rest of the Alliance knows nothing about, special powers, alternative motives....THERE IS A LOT! Hence, read slow, and enjoy.

  13. 4 out of 5

    John Rennie

    I love Schoen's depiction of Barsk. I loved it when I read the first book and I loved it all over again reading The Moons of Barsk. Elephants are widely depicted as gentle and gracious creatures in folklore, and Schoen takes this idea and with it creates the race of Fants. And he does a fantastic job. He manages to be totally convincing in his depiction of a race who can be just as fallible as us humans but nevertheless have a nobility and grace that is very attractive. If I can be the tiniest bit I love Schoen's depiction of Barsk. I loved it when I read the first book and I loved it all over again reading The Moons of Barsk. Elephants¹ are widely depicted as gentle and gracious creatures in folklore, and Schoen takes this idea and with it creates the race of Fants. And he does a fantastic job. He manages to be totally convincing in his depiction of a race who can be just as fallible as us humans but nevertheless have a nobility and grace that is very attractive. If I can be the tiniest bit critical I think the action gets a bit too frenetic in the closing chapters, and the book ends on a shameless cliffhanger/lead in to the next book. I'm not keen on authors doing that but ... well ... I'll be reading the next book anyway. ¹ a spoilerette, but most of us will guess within the first few pages that "Fants" are uplifted elephants. The big ears, trunks and grey wrinkled skin is a bit of a giveaway.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Karen A. Wyle

    First, before I forget: there will clearly be a #3 in this series. The ending of this book is as much of a cliffhanger as the endings of some books in Corey's Expanse series. It's been some months since I read the first book, but Schoen deftly seeds this sequel with sufficient reminders. For me, the series so far, and especially this book, teeters on the edge of overly metaphysical. But I still enjoyed it and found it compelling. (I'm a suspense wimp, so I peeked ahead a few pages toward the end a First, before I forget: there will clearly be a #3 in this series. The ending of this book is as much of a cliffhanger as the endings of some books in Corey's Expanse series. It's been some months since I read the first book, but Schoen deftly seeds this sequel with sufficient reminders. For me, the series so far, and especially this book, teeters on the edge of overly metaphysical. But I still enjoyed it and found it compelling. (I'm a suspense wimp, so I peeked ahead a few pages toward the end and then went back and actually read.) The characters and settings are varied and well imagined.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jamie Rich

    The Moons of Barsk (Kindle Edition) by Lawrence M. Schoen The continuing saga of our favorite elephant persons. This time it's personal, and oh yeah Jorl is in up to his trunk! Pizlo also has to go thru some rather agonizing times as well. Of the two, it's Pizlo's journey that sees the most maturation, growth and pain. he *finally* gets his Heroe's Quest, but it is not at all what he wanted, nor imagined it to become. Jorl does also have some dip trials and tribulations, and he really, really, d The Moons of Barsk (Kindle Edition) by Lawrence M. Schoen The continuing saga of our favorite elephant persons. This time it's personal, and oh yeah Jorl is in up to his trunk! Pizlo also has to go thru some rather agonizing times as well. Of the two, it's Pizlo's journey that sees the most maturation, growth and pain. he *finally* gets his Heroe's Quest, but it is not at all what he wanted, nor imagined it to become. Jorl does also have some dip trials and tribulations, and he really, really, doesn't like to be betrayed. Especially by the ranking fans in the Caudex! Again, a fun fantasy set in a SfiFi setting. So now we wait for the next book...

  16. 5 out of 5

    Udayan Chakrabarti

    Any follow up to the amazing Barsk : The Elephant's Graveyard had to bear the load of huge expectations. The result is somewhat uneven, both in terms of pace and plotting. The climax is magnificent though, where Schoen casually breaks our heart in a myriad ways and lays bare the very soul of humanity - the curious thing we call empathy.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Karl

    An excellent sequel to a great first book! The author expands his cast of characters, opens up his worldbuilding, answers questions and introduces more mysteries for the reader. I especially enjoyed the deep POV moments and the useful meditations on science and philosophy. Do yourself a favor and read this series.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Andy Grabia

    Some of the Pizlo storyline was beyond my comprehension, and I feel like the book made weird jumps in places and was rushed at the end. Nevertheless, I was so happy to read more about Barsk and the Fants, and I’m eager to read the next installment.

  19. 4 out of 5

    David

    Original, thoughtful read, even better than the first one. My full review at the New York Journal of Books here: https://www.nyjournalofbooks.com/book...

  20. 5 out of 5

    Samuel Lubell

    I read a review copy. I'll link to my review when it goes up.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Juliana

    4.5 stars

  22. 4 out of 5

    David

  23. 5 out of 5

    Carol Thompson

  24. 5 out of 5

    Seth Turner

  25. 5 out of 5

    Davianna

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sheryl R.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Dulcie Marshall

  28. 5 out of 5

    Ricky

  29. 4 out of 5

    Merschman

  30. 4 out of 5

    Erin

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