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Among the Hidden

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SHADOW CHILDREN Luke has never been to school. He's never had a birthday party, or gone to a friend's house for an overnight. In fact, Luke has never had a friend. Luke is one of the shadow children, a third child forbidden by the Population Police. He's lived his entire life in hiding, and now, with a new housing development replacing the woods next to his family's farm, h SHADOW CHILDREN Luke has never been to school. He's never had a birthday party, or gone to a friend's house for an overnight. In fact, Luke has never had a friend. Luke is one of the shadow children, a third child forbidden by the Population Police. He's lived his entire life in hiding, and now, with a new housing development replacing the woods next to his family's farm, he is no longer even allowed to go outside. Then, one day Luke sees a girl's face in the window of a house where he knows two other children already live. Finally, he's met a shadow child like himself. Jen is willing to risk everything to come out of the shadows -- does Luke dare to become involved in her dangerous plan? Can he afford "not" to?


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SHADOW CHILDREN Luke has never been to school. He's never had a birthday party, or gone to a friend's house for an overnight. In fact, Luke has never had a friend. Luke is one of the shadow children, a third child forbidden by the Population Police. He's lived his entire life in hiding, and now, with a new housing development replacing the woods next to his family's farm, h SHADOW CHILDREN Luke has never been to school. He's never had a birthday party, or gone to a friend's house for an overnight. In fact, Luke has never had a friend. Luke is one of the shadow children, a third child forbidden by the Population Police. He's lived his entire life in hiding, and now, with a new housing development replacing the woods next to his family's farm, he is no longer even allowed to go outside. Then, one day Luke sees a girl's face in the window of a house where he knows two other children already live. Finally, he's met a shadow child like himself. Jen is willing to risk everything to come out of the shadows -- does Luke dare to become involved in her dangerous plan? Can he afford "not" to?

30 review for Among the Hidden

  1. 5 out of 5

    Madeline

    I love this book! Iwould recomend it for anybody who has a craving for excitment and adventure. I also love the use of words, and the excitment. I cannot stop reading the book. Margaret Peterson Haddix is a tallented auther and has AMAZING creativity with books and words. Any book that she writes is or will be wonderfull.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jey

    I am adding this book as a warning. The first book and a half are very interesting and the plot is fascinating. DO NOT LET YOUR CHILDREN READ THESE BOOKS!! Somewhere in the second book, it begins to get quite violent. By the fourth or fifth book, there is holocaust-type violence, children killing in cold blood, and outrageous examples of treachery and hate. These books are dangerous, as the first one is so good. Please use caution when you give your children books to read. I learned the hard way I am adding this book as a warning. The first book and a half are very interesting and the plot is fascinating. DO NOT LET YOUR CHILDREN READ THESE BOOKS!! Somewhere in the second book, it begins to get quite violent. By the fourth or fifth book, there is holocaust-type violence, children killing in cold blood, and outrageous examples of treachery and hate. These books are dangerous, as the first one is so good. Please use caution when you give your children books to read. I learned the hard way to read all of a series before you recommend them whole-heartedly to a child.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Mariah

    I'm reading this book to my students and they love it, but I found it to be very boring. I'm not sure how others feel but nothing happens in this book, especially the first half. I read through the first half of the book super bored.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kelly H. (Maybedog)

    The issue faced by the characters in the book, that of overpopulation and what to do about it, is an important one, and deserves to have a children's book written about it. The possibility that we will one day be limited to two children or fewer per family, and people will undergo forced sterilization, is not so unlikely. China already has strict population control laws (one child) with heavy fines for violators. However the author simplifies the issue to a simple black and white set of extremes. The issue faced by the characters in the book, that of overpopulation and what to do about it, is an important one, and deserves to have a children's book written about it. The possibility that we will one day be limited to two children or fewer per family, and people will undergo forced sterilization, is not so unlikely. China already has strict population control laws (one child) with heavy fines for violators. However the author simplifies the issue to a simple black and white set of extremes. She fails to fully examine the issue of overpopulation. In the book, the need for population leveling is solely due to food shortages. The characters assert that it's mostly due to mismanagement by the government that the famine happened at all. In fact, everything bad appears to be the fault of the controlling, fascist, yet inept government. Even in the end, the author doesn't appear to grasp the reality of the effect of our population explosion: Food is not the only issue. Others include, "Where will we put all the waste from these people? How will there be enough drinking water? How will we have enough energy to run the machines we need to support our society? Where will resources come from to create things like clothes, furniture, houses, cars? How do we deal with all the pollution this manufacturing brings with that many more people? And how will we survive when we've cut down all the trees and there is no oxygen being produced? The simple answer given in the book seems to be "we could police ourselves--some people could have more kids if others had fewer". And who does that policing? We certainly aren't doing it now. What are realistic ways we can address this population issue? The author also appears to be showing how fascist and evil the government is by showing how they outlawed junk food and even meat. Vegetarians are truly the evil of the future. ;) This is an interesting absurdity in that more calories are contained in fat than in anything else, so if food were scarce, it would make more sense to make food very high in fat. One excellent point the author does assert is that those who make the laws often don't follow them. Exceptions are made when it is convenient for those in power. This is an excellent point and I would have liked this to be expanded a bit more. Especially since those in power (the U.S. right now) currently use up many times more resources per person than the non-powerful (3rd world countries). The barons in the book, by excepting themselves from the rules, are causing even greater harm. Yet, even that point isn't explained, just inferred. Perhaps the simplicity is necessary for a children's story, and yet, the heaviness of the topic and the tragedy of the plot, are all mature enough themes that any reader of the book should be able to handle the additional complexity. The author also only shows one side of the story: that of the victims of an extremist, totalitarian government who dealt inappropriately with a very real disaster. What I would have liked to have seen would have been an afterword that addressed some of these issues on a level kids could understand. Just presenting the ideas in a fictional context may be too confusing. Other award-winning children's books that either deal with confusing, heavy issues, or take place in other mystifying eras, have afterwards for more information. I think such a beast would help this book tremendously. As it is, I am curious to know what children reading this book come away with thinking: Is overpopulation bad? Or is the government bad and we don't really need to worry about overpopulation? Because I fear the latter is the message children will walk away with after reading this novel, I have to be very wary about recommending this book.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Mav

    After reading this, I am very surprised that the publishers determined the targeted reading age group to be "Age 8-12". It's a bit like Brave New World for YA. (See that bold print in the back that says: "an ALA Best Book for Young Adults".)

  6. 4 out of 5

    Selene Matheson

    Fourth Read: September 24, 2018 - Third Read: February 16, 2018 - February 26, 2018 4 Stars I read this with my grade 6 class. They loved it. Second Read: January 12, 2018 - January 26, 2018 4 Stars I read this with one of my grade 6 classes. They loved it. First Read: In elementary school 3 Stars

  7. 5 out of 5

    Katie Grace

    Aww, memories! I remember reading this when I was nine or ten. It was fun to revisit the world, though I'm not sure if I'll reread the other 12 or so in the series. Though I do want to know what happens... Hm, we'll see.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Farid

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This book is about a boy that is living I think that in the future, because of the Law that is happening in the book. The law of this book is that the families cant have more than 2 childs. So Luke the main character has to be hidden, he stays inside his house, and cant go out because if they see him they would kill him. While Luke was wondering by the window of his room he saw a face on the window from the "Barons" the family beside their house, the girl was called Jenniffer and she was also a This book is about a boy that is living I think that in the future, because of the Law that is happening in the book. The law of this book is that the families cant have more than 2 childs. So Luke the main character has to be hidden, he stays inside his house, and cant go out because if they see him they would kill him. While Luke was wondering by the window of his room he saw a face on the window from the "Barons" the family beside their house, the girl was called Jenniffer and she was also a third child. They both needed a fake identity and with that fake identity they could go and live with another family. But Jeniffer, Luke and other 40 third childs planned a rally, everyone was going but at the end Luke didnt wanted to go. So Luke then finds Jeniffer's father and he told him that the police had killed all the 40 kids and Jeniffer also. I really like it because it leaves you thinking in what will the life of Luke be in the next years. I would really recomend this book to you, for me it has been one of my favorite books that I have read. Also there are more books that follow upon this one that I WILL read them.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Olivia

    Among the Hidden...a wonderful book...futuristic!! Luke Garner is a third child, a hidden child. After the government passed the population law, third children and pets have been outlawed. But Luke's mother had always wanted four boys-"Matthew, Mark, Luke and John," she says. When Luke's farmland is bought to be turned into a neighborhood of barons, Luke takes interest to watching out of his attic vents. The Sports family's home, the Blonde family's home...he names them all. But wait...was tha Among the Hidden...a wonderful book...futuristic!! Luke Garner is a third child, a hidden child. After the government passed the population law, third children and pets have been outlawed. But Luke's mother had always wanted four boys-"Matthew, Mark, Luke and John," she says. When Luke's farmland is bought to be turned into a neighborhood of barons, Luke takes interest to watching out of his attic vents. The Sports family's home, the Blonde family's home...he names them all. But wait...was that a face in the window of the Sport's family's house? Luke is too timid to find out...or is he? In a way, some people I know are like Luke...sitting around letting the world be changed for them. I am not like that at all. If I were Luke, I would try to change the world. I'd stay outside, letting that late summer air blow in my eyes. My mom and dad would say to the questioning people, "Oh, she's our niece, that's...Patty." I would try to be Patty for as long as I could, as I show unquestionable loyalty to my family and close friends. Anyway, Luke, sitting in his attic, creates a plan. He breaks into the Sports family's house, and finds Jen, another "shadow child," as she puts it. Jen is me, the complete opposite of Luke, bold and daring. Jen and Luke become fast friends, but in April before Jen's rally, Luke turns down her offer. Jen wants to rally in front of the White House, to protest the population law. She and Luke have a big fight, leaving Luke scared and alone. Soon she returns to his house, to say goodbye as she leaves for the rally. When Jen doesn't come back, Luke is horrified and nervous. What if Jen-he can't bring himself to think of it. Overcome by curiosity, Luke sneaks back to Jen's house, where he is told by Jen's father that she is dead. At the end of the book, I myself was full of questions. Will Luke change the world like he promised to Jen's spirit? Will he get caught? Will he ever see his family again? But most importantly: When will Margaret Peterson Haddix write a sequel?

  10. 4 out of 5

    Rachelle

    This is a decent book about a fictional community where the government controls everything. The people are only allowed to have 2 children so anything after 2 they hide them. This is a story about a boy that has been hidden his entire life and find out that there are other hidden children out there as well. He meets a girl and they become friends. I have mixed feelings about this book. The reason I read it was because a friend of mine asked me about it. Her 11 year-old son read it and he was ups This is a decent book about a fictional community where the government controls everything. The people are only allowed to have 2 children so anything after 2 they hide them. This is a story about a boy that has been hidden his entire life and find out that there are other hidden children out there as well. He meets a girl and they become friends. I have mixed feelings about this book. The reason I read it was because a friend of mine asked me about it. Her 11 year-old son read it and he was upset and sad about some things in the book. She was kind of shocked and upset that he read such a book. So I read the book as a favor to her to see what kind of book it really was. So I honestly cannot say if I think it is appropriate for 11 year-olds. I probably would let mine read it but now that she has brought it to my attention I am kind of hesitant about what I really think. Don't know if that made any sense at all-Sorry..

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly

    Wow! I can't wait to read the rest of the series. Luke is a "third" child in a society that inforces population control. Families are allowed only two children. He is loved but lead a very solitary life. He meets another "third" child, Jen, and they form a friendship. Jen is the leader of a group of thirds and she's trying to change the laws so they no longer have to hide. Very inspiring, tender and quite a cliff hanger!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Mwestarkey97

    i love this book. read others in the series to continue the adventure.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Fred Kirchner

    I was not expecting too much, and was rewarded with a pleasantly surprising read. You can fly through this book in just a few hours, but why should you...? Here's why: Haddix creates a charming, star-crossed protagonist living in a dystopian society as a Shadow Child. Families are only allowed two kids. Luke is the third child to a strapped farming couple living on the edge of civilization. For most of his life, Luke's had the run of the back forty, but when a new housing development bring wealt I was not expecting too much, and was rewarded with a pleasantly surprising read. You can fly through this book in just a few hours, but why should you...? Here's why: Haddix creates a charming, star-crossed protagonist living in a dystopian society as a Shadow Child. Families are only allowed two kids. Luke is the third child to a strapped farming couple living on the edge of civilization. For most of his life, Luke's had the run of the back forty, but when a new housing development bring wealthy homes to their neck of the woods, Luke is forced to stay in the attic. He may never go outside again. Luke watches the new neighborhood from his secret attic lookout. One day he notices a blind flutter on one of the extravagant homes. Without his parents' knowledge, Luke sneaks over to the new neighborhood and meets another shadow child--a girl! She's linked into an underground network of Shadow Children. Adventures follow. Not too racy for your 6th grade nephew, yet deep enough for a high school ethics seminar (is there such a thing?.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Rikke

    4.5 stars. This story was so good, I read it in one sitting. If only I had the sequel, I would be reading it already. Really, that's how much I enjoyed it. It's very well told, the setting is believable and cruel, and... Well, there're lots of great things to say about it, instead I'll just recommend you read it.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Ally

    I LOVE THIS BOOK! I read it last year in two days. The ending made me cry and wanting more. I love the series and want to maybe want to reread the series again!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Julie Klein

    This book is GREAT so far! Wonderful recommendation by one of my fabulous students. Can't wait to discuss it in book club :)

  17. 5 out of 5

    Daisy W

    AwEsOMe!!!!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    This book was a good start to a series, but it felt like a non-ending or an obvious sequel set up. Even in a young adult series each book should be able to stand alone in terms of satisfying the reader that the story is over, this one didn't really do that for me. The character development was ok but again, I'm not going to cut it slack for being for young readers, there were several characters that should have been more dimensional but weren't. As an example Jen's dad needed to be introduced by This book was a good start to a series, but it felt like a non-ending or an obvious sequel set up. Even in a young adult series each book should be able to stand alone in terms of satisfying the reader that the story is over, this one didn't really do that for me. The character development was ok but again, I'm not going to cut it slack for being for young readers, there were several characters that should have been more dimensional but weren't. As an example Jen's dad needed to be introduced by his name ASAP instead of just referring to him as Jen's dad for three chapters. Another oddity was how easily the author made Jen's idiotic plans come together. It was third person but you never get to see anything Luke doesn't get to see, she might as well have written in first person POV from Luke's perspective because that is basically what you get. If she had used third person more to her advantage we would have seen all that Jen did rather than hear from Luke that she seemed tired. As much as it annoyed me, and it did, I did find it to be an interesting, however conflicted read. The different mentalities about the government was an interesting aspect and showing the characters personality by how they see the government was a good way to get insight into the characters quickly. I ordered this for my twelve year old niece upon a recommendation and decided to read it myself to be sure she'd like it, I ordered the second book immediately upon finishing this one. It may not be my cuppa but I think a young reader would enjoy it more than I did. It gets a three out of five.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Nolann_E1

    "Among the hidden” written by Margaret Peterson is a book where you are able to feel all of these emotions at once and lose your self. I’m not able to relate to the book but I’m able to relate to the emotions of the main character, Luke. I am able to relate to his emotions because I have felt what he is feeling. The book really made me feel so many feelings at once so I didn’t know what to feel. This book is very special, even my sister thought it was a fascinating book. I can tell that the auth "Among the hidden” written by Margaret Peterson is a book where you are able to feel all of these emotions at once and lose your self. I’m not able to relate to the book but I’m able to relate to the emotions of the main character, Luke. I am able to relate to his emotions because I have felt what he is feeling. The book really made me feel so many feelings at once so I didn’t know what to feel. This book is very special, even my sister thought it was a fascinating book. I can tell that the author put her heart and soul into the book. It contains so many details and suspense. Right now I am reading the 7th book and I am loving it. If I had to rate this book, it would be a definite 5. I recommend this book to all readers who love fiction, a bit of mystery, and things that affect a certain society or population. This book is the best book I have ever read and even the title catches my eye. To end, this book is a book everyone should read.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jen Durand

    When childhood memories, bring you back you know it is a good book. Lots of mystery, drama, and sprinkles of actions. So great. I loved it and am constantly recommending it to my younger siblings.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca McNutt

    The dystopian society in Among the Hidden is a frightening idea, but reading about the main character's adventures is worthwhile. :)

  22. 4 out of 5

    JonathanT

    1. Twisty and extremely gripping plot line that kept me up until about midnight. 2. But I didn't really like any of the characters all that much? That's the main reason this one's getting three stars. 3. 99% clean, I think there was maybe one comment that was mostly benign anyways 4. But it does address issues like population control, so I probably wouldn't give this to a younger reader. So I may or may not finish this series, we shall see. :)

  23. 5 out of 5

    Lucy (Talk Less, Smile More)

    I just have to say, what an amazing start to a series! For the past couple of months, I've been having a hard time finding books that'll hold my interest. But once I picked up 'Among The Hidden,' I was immediately sucked into this world (well, it did have it's draggy bits, but nevertheless, I was sucked in). I can't quite explain it, but it gave me all of those Unwind feels. This isn't your average dystopian book, I feel that it can stand on its own, much like Unwind, it was very unique, but I d I just have to say, what an amazing start to a series! For the past couple of months, I've been having a hard time finding books that'll hold my interest. But once I picked up 'Among The Hidden,' I was immediately sucked into this world (well, it did have it's draggy bits, but nevertheless, I was sucked in). I can't quite explain it, but it gave me all of those Unwind feels. This isn't your average dystopian book, I feel that it can stand on its own, much like Unwind, it was very unique, but I did have some problems with it (hence the four stars and not five). Among the Hidden is set in a world where parents are only allowed to have two children. But not everyone agrees with these laws, and that's where the term "shadow children" comes into play. We start out by meeting our main character, Luke Garner, a twelve-year-old shadow child (a third child born to a family) who must stay hidden at all times. Luke stays in his family's attic day in and day out until his new neighbors move in, and he realizes that maybe there are more children like him out there. So, let's get to our characters (this isn't going to take long because there weren't many). First, we have our MC, Luke Garner. I really liked Luke and how he progressed throughout the story. In the beginning, you have this boy who seems pretty content with everything. At first, Luke couldn't go outside for very long, and then it came to a point where he couldn't go out at all. As the chapters progressed "privileges" and I can't even believe that I'm calling them privileges, are slowly taken away from Luke. Privileges such as not being able to eat dinner at the same table as your family. The more the story progressed the heavier my heart felt. It got to a point to where I wasn't even sure who to be upset with, the government for enforcing that the parents can only have two children, or the parents for subjecting their kids to this lifestyle. So, I felt bad for Luke, but as I was saying I liked watching his irritation at his circumstances slowly build within him. He realized the life he was living wasn't fair. Luke went from being a sheltered boy to possibly being the leader of a revolution. I am here for it! Next, we're introduced to the other third child who happens to be Luke's next door neighbor, "Jen" (Jennifer Rose Talbot). I loved Jen so much! She was so fierce and so passionate about what she believes in. I admire people like that, and that's exactly who Jen was. I loved how she was able to ignite a fire in Luke and make him realize that the population laws were complete bull. (view spoiler)[ I was so sad that Jen died, but I can't act like I didn't see it coming. For one, I knew that the government would've had those children killed at the rally. I mean, they were all third children, which meant that there was no evidence of their existence, they could get away with killing them scot-free. But I knew she would have a huge impact on him. People like that always do. What was even surprising is that she was a Baron (extremely rich) and yet she cared about ALL third children. (hide spoiler)] And as for the side characters, I didn't like them. Luke's mother was okay, the brothers were jerks, as all older brothers are (lol jk!), and I had enough of Luke's father's sexist remarks such as, "That's okay Luke," he said. "I'm not sure I'd want any son of mine getting too good at baking, anyhow. That's what a man gets married for." So, let's get to the plot. As I said before, I did have some problems with this book. The main problem I had was that the beginning of it dragged. I know it's completely understandable, since the author wants to you really feel what it's like in the life of a third child who has to remain hidden all the time, but it really dragged. Luke was in the attic most of the time, and if he wasn't in the attic, his dad was being unnecessarily mean, or his brothers were teasing him (that didn't happen much though), or his mom was babying him. Things didn't pick up until he met Jen. That's the only "problem" I had. I understand that sometimes the first book of a series has to start off slow so we can get a feel for the world. So the dragging wasn't THAT big of an issue. Overall, I'm loving where this story is heading, and I can't wait to read the next six books! (view spoiler)[ And see how, Lee Grant, adapts to his new identity! (hide spoiler)]

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ömer

    4.6/5 Yorumu için: http://kronikokur.blogspot.com.tr/201...

  25. 5 out of 5

    Ehsan

    A. The thing I like about the book is that Luke’s family lived on a farm and they were not rich. And if they were rich they would keep on bribing people and that would make the book boring. B. The things I did not like are how Jen went to the rally and the government did that very cruel thing to the kids. C. 1. The characters in the story were Luke, Mathew and mark (Luke’s brothers) Jen Luke’s best friend, Luke’s mom and dad, and Jen’s dad. 2. The most important scene of the book was when Luke di A. The thing I like about the book is that Luke’s family lived on a farm and they were not rich. And if they were rich they would keep on bribing people and that would make the book boring. B. The things I did not like are how Jen went to the rally and the government did that very cruel thing to the kids. C. 1. The characters in the story were Luke, Mathew and mark (Luke’s brothers) Jen Luke’s best friend, Luke’s mom and dad, and Jen’s dad. 2. The most important scene of the book was when Luke discovered another third child. Luke was staring at the vents and he saw something move in the Baron’s house. Luke thought that was a third child because he counted that all 28 people in the neighborhood had left. If that did not happen nothing would’ve happen to Luke. 3. The genre of the book is science fiction 4. The setting of this book is Luke house and Jen house, it was also in the U.S.A were the government controls the kids. This all takes place sometime in the future. D. This book reminds me of the story of Anne Frank and the story of what happened to the Jews when Hitler killed thousands of Jews because he hated them. I think that because the government wants no third children and Hitler doesn’t want Jews. The government killed third children and Hitler killed the Jews in World War II. E. I think the special reason someone will want to read this book is if they have a third child or are a third child because then the book will show them what could happen if they had them in a time when government controlled kids. F. This book does have a sequel. It is the first book in the Shadow Children series. This is the first time I read a book by the author. This book reminds me of Anne Frank because they both are hiding in attics basements and running away from the Germans. I would recommend this book because it is very in unpredictable and very inspiring. I think this is a good book to read.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Godfrees

    Anyone who has spent time around middle grade books, whether library or book fairs, has probably seen Haddix books. Margaret Peterson Haddix is a prolific author of MG fiction. Among the Hidden is the first book of hers I have read. I selected it particularly because of its premise: due to severe overpopulation, the government has passed laws that allow couples to have only two children. Disobedience is punished by death. Luke is a third child, a shadow child. He can’t go outside, have friends, Anyone who has spent time around middle grade books, whether library or book fairs, has probably seen Haddix books. Margaret Peterson Haddix is a prolific author of MG fiction. Among the Hidden is the first book of hers I have read. I selected it particularly because of its premise: due to severe overpopulation, the government has passed laws that allow couples to have only two children. Disobedience is punished by death. Luke is a third child, a shadow child. He can’t go outside, have friends, or even sit at the table with his family for dinner. It’s not much of a life until he meets another shadow child. My WIP (work in progress) also has restrictions on child bearing due to overpopulation, like Among the Hidden. I enjoyed Haddix’s first novel in this series and plan to read the rest. They are short books (this one was 153 pages), so for a reading enthusiast like me, it’s almost a short story. Theology: Government is God Among the Hidden is a secular novel. As such, there is no mention of God. Like most dystopian fiction, the government plays the role of God, deciding what’s best for the population. Of course, like any human endeavor, it is prone to corruption by those who crave power. Rating: PG The book is clean – no sex, drugs, rock n’ roll. The PG rating is based purely on the somewhat mature content/premise of the book. Social Issues: Based on China’s One Child policy (I assume), Among the Hidden explores government sanctions and the price of disobeying them. Fear of discovery. Children being hidden away because the alternative is death. An underground movement. Conspiracy. Cover ups. Propaganda.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Ny'dea

    Among The Hidden was written by Margaret Peterson Haddix, this is a fiction book. This book had a lot of parts that made me stare into the book. The word hidden in the title has a lot to do with what occurs in the book, actually the book revolves around the word hidden. A strength in the book that I noticed was how the author put in events that where in the characters past to help give a glimpse of the character. For example the author mentioned the main character, Luke celebrating his birthday. Among The Hidden was written by Margaret Peterson Haddix, this is a fiction book. This book had a lot of parts that made me stare into the book. The word hidden in the title has a lot to do with what occurs in the book, actually the book revolves around the word hidden. A strength in the book that I noticed was how the author put in events that where in the characters past to help give a glimpse of the character. For example the author mentioned the main character, Luke celebrating his birthday. In this part of the story, the author tells how Luke felt when he was younger in the past to him being older in the present. Another strength in the book that I noticed was how the author didn’t just use one point of view, she used two different points of views. For example the author wrote about Luke’s past in first person. She wrote in the third person when she talked about Luke daydreaming Something that people might be asking is, if the main characters are believable? The main characters are believable, because Luke is a person who is willing to take a risk to find out something. This is the same as people who take risks. I can write myself down as someone who would take risks to try something new. The author also does an adequate job with describing, because she described what the character was wearing more than once. This book gives an example how people who make laws jeopardize others’ lives. This book also has great details to help describe the story. I hope many others will enjoy this book.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Janet Amaya

    What I like about this book: • It’s a captivating book; you just want to keep reading it. • The book is very suspenseful; you don’t know what’s going to happen next. For example, it was captivating because you didn’t know what he was going to do he was somewhat indecisive. Another example was that you didn’t know what was going to happen next, so many things happened that you didn’t think we’re going to happen. One thing I didn’t like about the book is that the ending is bittersweet. Characters: Luke What I like about this book: • It’s a captivating book; you just want to keep reading it. • The book is very suspenseful; you don’t know what’s going to happen next. For example, it was captivating because you didn’t know what he was going to do he was somewhat indecisive. Another example was that you didn’t know what was going to happen next, so many things happened that you didn’t think we’re going to happen. One thing I didn’t like about the book is that the ending is bittersweet. Characters: Luke, Jen, and Jen’s dad One important scene is when Luke has the guts to sprint over to Sport family’s house to see if there was another shadow child in that house. Genre: Science Fiction Setting: Takes place in the United States in the future where the Government is taking over everything. This book reminds me of the movie and novel, The Hunger Games, where the government controls everything and it takes place in the future. The reason why anyone would ever read this book is because it’s so interesting and very captivating. You get so drawn into the book and don’t want to stop reading it. Among the Hidden does have a series after it the books are Among the Imposters, Among the Betrayed, Among the Barons, Among the Brave, and Among the Free.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Skip

    12-year old Luke is a third child in a society where two is the limit; however, he notices signs of life in a deserted home and ventures out against all rules to find another hidden third child, Jen. Jen is bold and wants freedom for all, trying to enlist others similarly situated in a massive protest. Luke is too scared to go along and then has to face the dire consequences of his inaction. While this is a decent adventure of sorts, with compelling social issues, I think Haddix has unnessarily 12-year old Luke is a third child in a society where two is the limit; however, he notices signs of life in a deserted home and ventures out against all rules to find another hidden third child, Jen. Jen is bold and wants freedom for all, trying to enlist others similarly situated in a massive protest. Luke is too scared to go along and then has to face the dire consequences of his inaction. While this is a decent adventure of sorts, with compelling social issues, I think Haddix has unnessarily dumbed her writing down. Six more to read.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Max

    I really liked this book, especially because it didn't have a happy ending in the least.

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